Heart Sutra: The Power of the Buddha

There are various translations of the Heart Sutra, those variations depending on scholarly traditions, original language of the Sutra being translated, interpretations of the translators and so forth. I have been thinking about this portion of the Sutra, derived from the Tibetan:

.... the Blessed One was absorbed in the concentration of the countless aspects of phenomena called “profound illumination.”
At that very time the Superior Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva, the great being, was looking perfectly at the practice of the profound perfection of wisdom, perfectly looking at the emptiness of inherent existence of the five aggregates also.
Then, through the power of Buddha, the Venerable Shariputra said to the Superior Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva, the great being, “How should a child of the lineage train who wishes to engage in the practice of the profound perfection of wisdom?”

What interests me here are these phrases: through the power of Buddha [who] was absorbed in the concentration of the countless aspects of phenomena called profound illumination, the Venerable Shariputra said to the Superior Avalokiteshvara ....." Here I find a reference to the relation of master and disciple, in which the mental condition of the master affects the mental condition of the disciple.  The consciousness of the Buddha, in the concentration on the aspects of phenomena, that is, their emptiness, so affects the disciple, Shariputra, that the disciple asks a question about emptiness.
Often this part of the Sutra is passed over by teachers, although Geshe Rabten goes into considerable discussion about this "power" in his book Echoes of Voidness.  For me these passages epitomize the relationship I have with my own (departed) teacher Locho Rinpoche -- which is a consciousness-to-consciousness connection which is the very basis of my practice of meditation, because in it I depend on his realizations.
The master does not just represent the ideal to which I strive as a student; he is the expression of the Buddha-mind itself, and as such is within me as much as he was within the transitory collection of his former body.  So when I look within, I find him as much as, or perhaps even more than, when I looked at him face-to-face.  And so my practice depends upon him and his realizations both in his life and beyond his life, because that Buddha-mind has not gone anywhere even though the transitory collection of Locho Rinpoche is now in the past. 

And because he and I were never fundamentally separate, when I write that my practice depends on his realizations I also am writing that my practice depends on the me which is we.

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